Kremlin
The Moscow Kremlin is frequently referred to as the "Eighth Wonder of the World".

 It is located on the left bank of the Moskva River and considered one of the most beautiful architectual ensembles in the world. For many centuries the Kremlin has been the heart of Moskow.

The Kremlin has always been perceived as a symbol of power and mighty of the Russian state, the national idea expressed in stone. Each era in the history of Russia left its significant architectural trace in the Kremlin.

On the territory of the Kremlin there are buildings of 5 Russian Orthodox Cathedrals among which the most famous is the Cathedral of Assumption (1475–79) — Russia's principal church; the Bell Tower named after Ivan the Great (1505–08); the Tsar Bell — the biggest bell in the world (1733-35); the Tsar Cannon with the largest caliber of any gun in the world (1586); the Grand Kremlin Palace (which is a group of several buildings with the main section dating back to 1838–1849); the Arsenal (early 19th cent); the Palace of Congresses (1961) and many other objects.

The Uspensky (Assumption) Cathedral is one of the oldest edifices of the Kremlin. It was  built by the Italian architect Aristotle Fiorovanti, who had spent many years in Russia studying traditional architecture. Topped by five gilt domes, it is both austere and solemn. It contains rare ancient paintings, including the icon of the Virgin of Vladimir (11th cent) and the icons of St. George (12th cent) and the Trinity (14th cent). The carved throne of Ivan the Terrible also stands here.